Knowledge & Beliefs about the Intervention

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Knowledge & Beliefs about the Intervention
Taxonomy
Domain
Characteristics of Individuals
Siblings
Individual Identification with Organization
Individual Stage of Change
Knowledge & Beliefs about the Intervention
Other Personal Attributes
Self-efficacy
Measurement maturity
Quantitative tools


Contents

Version 1.0

Individuals’ attitudes toward and value placed on the intervention as well as familiarity with facts, truths, and principles related to the intervention.

Description

Individuals' attitudes toward and value placed on the intervention, as well as familiarity with facts, truths, and principles related to the intervention. Skill in using the intervention is a primarily cognitive function that relies on adequate how-to knowledge and knowledge of underlying principles or rationale for adopting the intervention[1]. Enthusiastic use of an intervention can be reflected by a positive affective response to the intervention. Often, subjective opinions obtained from peers based on personal experiences are more accessible and convincing, and these opinions help to generate enthusiasm[1]. Of course, the converse is true as well, often creating a negative source of active or passive resistance[2]. The degree to which new behaviors are positively or negatively valued heightens intention to change, which is a precursor to actual change[3].

Rationale for inclusion

Individuals’ attitudes toward the intervention and familiarity with facts, truths, and principles related to the intervention. Users’ skilled and enthusiastic use of the intervention, are two key features of effective implementation[4]. These attributes are important to understand at individual and sub-group levels in order to assess quality of implementation and prospects for sustainability. Skill in using the intervention is a primarily cognitive function that relies on adequate how-to knowledge and knowledge of underlying principles or rationale for adopting the intervention[1]. Skill levels reflect the effectiveness of training. If this knowledge (see Access to Information and Knowledge) is not obtained prior to an individual having to use the intervention, rejection and discontinuance are likely[5]. The competence of individuals to judge the effectiveness of an intervention is facilitated by their understanding of underlying principles that justify using the intervention. When knowledge can be codified and transferred across contexts, implementation is more likely to be successful[6]. Enthusiastic use of an intervention requires a positive affective response to the intervention. Often, subjective opinions obtained from peers, based on personal experiences are more accessible and convincing and these opinions help to generate enthusiasm (more so than objective evidence requiring cognitive responses)[1]. The converse can be true as well, however, creating a negative source of active or passive resistance.

Measurement

Qualitative codebook guidelines

Inclusion criteria



Exclusion criteria


Quantitative measures

Attachments

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Rogers E: Diffusion of Innovations 5th edition. New York, NY: Free Press; 2003.
  2. Saint S, Kowalski CP, Banaszak-Holl J, Forman J, Damschroder L, Krein SL: How Active Resisters and Organizational Constipators Affect Health Care-Acquired Infection Prevention Efforts. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety 2009, 35:239-246.
  3. Ajzen I: The theory of planned behavior. Organ Behav Hum Decis Process 1991, 50:179-211.
  4. Klein KJ, Sorra JS: The Challenge of Innovation Implementation. The Academy of Management Review 1996, 21:1055-1080.
  5. Klein KJ, Conn AB, Sorra JS: Implementing computerized technology: An organizational analysis. J Appl Psychol 2001, 86:811-824.
  6. Greenhalgh T, Robert G, Macfarlane F, Bate P, Kyriakidou O: Diffusion of innovations in service organizations: systematic review and recommendations. Milbank Q 2004, 82:581-629.
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