Self-efficacy

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Self-efficacy
Taxonomy
Domain
Characteristics of Individuals
Siblings
Individual Identification with Organization
Individual Stage of Change
Knowledge & Beliefs about the Intervention
Other Personal Attributes
Self-efficacy
Measurement maturity
Quantitative tools


Contents

Version 1.0

Individual belief in their own capabilities to execute courses of action to achieve implementation goals.

Description

Individual belief in their own capabilities to execute courses of action to achieve implementation goals[1]. Self-efficacy is a significant component in most individual behavior change theories[2]. Self-efficacy is dependent on the ability to perform specific actions within a specific context. The more confident an individual feels about his or her ability to make the changes needed to achieve implementation goals, the higher their self-efficacy. Individuals with high self-efficacy are more likely to make a decision to embrace the intervention and exhibit committed use even in the face of obstacles.

Rationale for inclusion

Individual belief in their own capabilities to execute courses of action to achieve implementation goals[1]. Self-efficacy is a significant component in most individual behavior change theories and models[2]. Self-efficacy is a key variable in most individual behavior change models[2]. Stakeholders with high self-efficacy are more likely to make a decision to embrace the intervention and exhibit committed use even in the face of obstacles. However, if they are not confident in their ability to use the intervention or experience a level of failure early-on, they will not be motivated to persist in the face of challenges that may arise[2].

Measurement

Qualitative codebook guidelines

Inclusion criteria



Exclusion criteria


Quantitative measures

Attachments

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bandura A: Self-efficacy: toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. Psychol Rev 1977, 84:191-215.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Theory at a Glance: A guide for health promotion practice (PDF)
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